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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 265 (some duplicates have been removed)
corridor area. >> one of our challenges was irreversible police force with a very large city. that was j-r stone reporting. bratton also talked about instilling more community ------------------------ >> catherine: a woman who was gang raped on a city bus in india has died. the vicious crime has been protests have swept through india since her attack two weeks ago. and now indian officials have closed off access to the country's main government building in kron-4's jeff bush was at a vigil held today at the >> reporter: about three dozen protestors gathered at the consolate on arguello street just before sundown. many of them are indian expatriates and say something needs to be done to address women's rights in >> (protest organizer) preeti shekar: this incident is one of many that have been going on and we are here to say that violence against women is not ok and we need to do something >> manoj hergarwl, protestor: i'm a citizen of india and i thought i should be herejust, as a guy, i feel so sad and it is shameful what has happened people without ties to india>> marcia poole, protesto
, portland, toronto, chicago, tampa as some large cities that have sunday meter parking polices. the rationale for the sunday meter parking policy includes reduced frustration for all motorists. more successful neighborhood commercial district, which rely on parking available for customers. reduces congestion and all revenue returned to to mta. there is a question about how the meters operate if you have to run out there at noon to feed the meter and the answer is that the meters will accept pre-payment beginning at 4:00 a.m. and so you can make a pre-payment and then starting at noon, the payment that you make will take effect. and then there is the parking meter rates will be the sames on sunday. i included in your binders, there is -- i will put it on the overhead -- -- the sfmta is undertaking a public outreach program providing the form that i just put on the overhead. they are going to be printing tens of thousands of those. and have them available for local businesses to hand out to customers. there is also very similar design for 11x17 posters along with cash regist
that there is no such thing. i mean, you know, we are unique but we're not that unique. there are other large city departments around, not just the country but the world, that deal with multiple floors, multiple functions, multiple departments. >> example, in oakland, they only submit the job. san jose also submit a job. los angeles also submit a job. it's a little bit different in our case. therefore we are still looking, doesn't mean we give up the idea. >> great. >> deputy director sweeney, you were just going to say --. >> i think if we ever came across a system or heard of a system that's worked, bring it to us and talk to us about it. >> we had los angeles building and safety up two months ago and i showed them the fifth floor, they were very surprised about the ease with which you can come in. they say you make an appointment and you come in at 11:00, 10 after 11:00 and you meet the building inspector or the engineer, then you can go over the counter, but you have to have an appointment. second thing they were surprised about is some of the size of the jobs that we'll plan check over t
in our great city. we are a large city. i get to talk and write about the things we're doing, and i want you to know that the internment -- and permit, our commitment to greening are parts of what we're here to do because of the advocacy that you do across the country, keep of that work, keep reminding mayors like me and everybody else we have an obligation to take the greening ideas and put them into the urban setting. give our kids the chance to get dirty with their hands, but watch things grow as they grow. this is the only way i know how to run the city. i have worked in this alleyways for many years. worked in the dirtiest smelling streets of our city. i come out loving our people even greater. whenever graffiti we have is our challenge. whenever illegal dumping that goes on. it is the ability to excite and organize our communities around these issues that bring out the best of all of us. the investment in our neighborhoods is one of my number one priorities as the mayor of the city. and to have example after example of how we can unite more of our neighborhoods to make that investm
they could not put a park there because it was all sand dunes. people were pushing for a large city park in other places. it was a political compromise. >> between lincoln and fulton and the beach. >> you're saying, why did they decide that exact plot? they brought someone from new york to come up with a park plan. they eventually made it a rectangle. they had the panhandle part. the panhandle was the same with as golden gate park, but there was dealmaking going on between park commissioners and they decided they would buy the land and cut off part of the panhandle. >> the development of lincoln park is interesting. you can see the cemetery. >> on the map, it is a cemetery. >> what happened to that and all of the bodies? >> they decided around the turn of the century the land was too valuable to bury people. where uss is now there were four cemeteries. they moved all of the cemetery's out -- cemeteries out. the heir did not want to move one of the places. there are two people -- two places where people are buried in the city. the other ones were moved out. >> the big scandal of lincoln p
want to thank everyone involved,edth warriors, design team, large city staff team, and most importantly the cac and the community at large for working with us to develop and respond to a design concept in what has been a very short period of time given the magnitude and complexity of the project. and second, we want to make it clear that even though as you will see, there is a ton of work and thought, there is obviously put into the design so far, we are very early in the process and there will be a lot more evolution over the next year. so, by way of a brief introduction to the concept itself or the design itself, please keep in mind that this is a concept, not a finished design ferment however, pretty some of the pictures look, this is a concept. that means it's more about at this stage the function of the sites, use kind of a prosaic word, the shapes, the materials of the building are not proposed yet. basically today we would ask you to focus on whether the proposal succeeds in meeting the basic goals that we have for a development on this site. these were developed early by staff a
. second, i described the mailing for these large city-run five acre and larger projects. that same would apply if they were ve
of the business is in the mid-sized to smaller communities who have even fewer resources than the large cities, less expertise. if you take options off the table, it will be, well, what we've done for the last 40 years, and right now we have some real challenges. so any good manager is going to want to have a maximum number of options. allbee: you've got to have a serious conversation with your constituency about what it costs to deliver the service that you're required to deliver and to deliver the service that they want. paolicelli: and i think, ultimately, the responsibility is going to be down to the user of this commodity. it costs money to operate these systems. there's a need to continually invest in these systems. there's going to be new regulations. it's all going to cost money. allbee: for all practical purposes, people are going to have to pay about twice as much for these services as they currently do. because a lot of the pipe that went in, a lot of the plants that went in, went in with very sizable portions of federal grant money, mechanisms that are no longer in place. narrator:
. >> might challenge was that it was a very small police force for a very large city. we were able to implement change and that the crime rate has gone for 12 consecutive years. >> reporter: he also says that the public's opinion about the police force and willing to turn that around that around in oakland as well. j.r. stone kron 4 news. >> oakland is 400,000 it has seen the 130 murders. the most in five years. oakland has about 400-thousand residents. it's seen 130 murders.most in five years. one of every three-thousand people were killed in san francisco's populationit has seen 67 murders.that's up 34 percentso one in every 12-thousand people were murdered this year in san franisco. and san jose has nearly 1 million people. 45 murders this year, most since 1991. one in every 21,000 people were killed in san jose. all three bay area cities saw homicides increase this year compared to 2011. for comparison.we'll widen the view. chicaco has 2.7 million people.and 499 murders this year.that's one in every 54- hundred people being murdered.,,just a little better than oakland. and new
and transparency is which are significant and when you talk to other large cities and i work with new york and l.a. and boston and we talk about what we're working on and san francisco is one of the leaders they look up to and how to do it and we are doing things on a national scale people are taking notice of and doing that and i heard a lot of talk, and i come from the private sector so when i first got here one of the questions i got "how
ranked among the worst in the nation, even though the district was spending more per pupil than large u.s. cities, almost $13,000 per student. but in 2009, washington, d.c. became first in the nation to tie teacher salaries to student test scores under a program called "impact." teachers rated highly effective can get annual bonuses up to $25,000 if they stay at that achievement level for two straight years, they can also get a base salary increase of $20,000. a highly effective teacher can earn $76,000, the first year, and reach $131,000 in just nine years. less effective teachers earn 51,000 to start and are fired if they get poor involveses for two straight years. this year, 98 teachers were fired for poor performance. but nathan saunders, president of the washington teachers union, says the system is unfair to teachers when many of their student have barriers to learning, such as poverty. >> the penalties are so immediate and so painful, not just immediate in terms of their paycheck, but also immediate in terms of their careers. >> reporter: in washington, test scores are still amon
district, but for the city at-large and for a point of reference, much of the monies that were spent last year were spent reconverting the horseman campus to continue to develop the former bryant campus for international high school. to redo the isa campus and to finish building the brand-new tech 21 career building at the john o'connell campus. so there is a lot of really exciting projects that this work has funded and next year we have a number of similar projects targeted including trying to replace the final remaining modular what's buildings that we are renting with permanent classroom buildings. so with that, i would ask if there have any questions that you might have and hopefully you will approve the report. thank you. >> thank you; there are no public speakers for this item. any comments from the board or superintendents? >> no, but i read it. >> it's right here. >> i move the recommendations. >> we already did. roll call, please. >> have i one question? >> commissioner? >> thank you president yee. this report is annual or every five years? >> it's annual. >> it's ac
are no or low cost but others like caa have large potential costs to the city and we didn't do that analysis. >> there is financial considerations. there is political considerations, and so if we have a document -- if we go to the next lafco meeting in january -- whenever it is. we will see the schedule later. it might be too quick to do that in a month and a different resolution for that, but i think that si process that is essential that we go to and provide a road map. >> and the last page in the report and lists the recommendations and near term, mid-term or long-term so the next two to three or three to seven or longer term so we started that work but certainly a lot more to do. >> i also have a question on the emphasis on pg&e and i am wondering if you could talk more about that. i am curious why there is equal treatment of clean power sf and pg&e since you have a program with clean power sf where the city has more control over it and i am wondering if you could talk about that, and by the way was pg&e on the task force? >> yes pg&e was a member of the task force and they did ask at
that that department and the city at large respond to complaints about bed bugs; it has become more prevalent. it has become a lot more of the issue as the media gives more attention to this. the city has adopted protocols to respond to this in a more timely manner. to get back to the report, the mission sro collaborative, senior action collaborative, we went out and we interviewed over 150 sro tenants who live in chinatown, mission, central city area, seniors, people with disabilities. we had a wide range of questions. it is focused on being a needs assessment. to see what sort of needs the population was facing so we could identify recommendations slowly work to implement those recommendations. we have a couple of other people who will speak about those things today. i will turn it over to jessica at this point to talk a little bit more about what the results of the report were and some of the recommendations that came out of that report. >> thank you. thanks so much to the council for having us here and thank you to joanna fraguli for coordinating this. it is exciting work. it is won
the city on large projects can say this can pencil out or can't. it should stop some fly by night stuff people tried to propose and it serves that purpose. it's vetted by harvey rose and says yeah it can fly if all of these things come into play. they come into place at the time of the term sheet and the last negotiations. they're sort of in my opinion the fiscal fiscallablity study is like an eir and takes the big box and study everything in the box and see whether it's possible, what are the mitigations, and then guild within that box. the same thing with the fiscal feasibility study it's to look at it and come down to the actual terms. i know it's a very aggressive plan. the concept to play in arena in 2017 blew everyone's mind and still does. i don't know if it can be done. i really don't in this city but i think there is a responsibility of the cac, of the commission and certainly the board of supervisors to see whether it's possible and i look forward to the process, so as long as people understand that this city works by process, and usually does it pretty well. thank you.
is becoming more of a public recreation and open space access for the city at large which really gets integrated with mixed use development sites that are identified within the waterfront land use plan, and in carrying out this planning process originally there was another advisory group that was created that recommended a plan to the port commission at the time. the port commission in 1997 approved that plan and upon approving the plan then the port also then went to work with the planning commission and the board of supervisors and mb dc to outline the policies appropriate for the waterfront with the city's planned policies for the waterfront and to align the various jurisdictions and to try to give careful and consistent focus what should be happening along that waterfront. as i mentioned there are mixed use development opportunities that are identified in the land use plan, and the bryant street opportunity area is one of those within the south beach area consisting of pier 30-32 and sea wall lot 330. during the plan process it was always seen as an opportunity to create these m
which were moving into areas it had been difficult for many years, and so what is it the city can, would do in order to -- for that not to happen? >> planning. >> there is obviously a large silence here. plaps the director -- >> it's a private corporate decision to stay open or not. the question i think that is appropriate for the city and the successor agency depending on the location whether other stores can fill those spaces? and one of the things -- just to back up i had the same concern. those stores represent an opportunity and what we were calling food deserts in the city for a long time so i was going to talk to the office of economic development to work with if not them with potentially other stores to take those spaces and if fresh and easy wanted to lease them to other operator versus just walking away. >> one thing i observed and we talked about retail, large grocery stores that my observation was fresh and easy in a city other than san francisco in other food starved neighborhoods, food store starved neighborhoods i saw a certain lack of relevance for the type of foods the
for itself and the city at large mountain on mountain of trouble. to build districts that are custom made for easy crime is idiotic. yes, that is what we do. this was written in 1961. public peace, the street and the sidewalk is not kept primarily by the police. it's kept by intricate unconscious voluntary controls and standards among the people themselves and enforced by the people themselves. no amount of police can enforce civilization or the normal casual enforcement of it has broken down. a well used city street is apt to be a safe city street. a deserted street is apt to be unsafe. there must be eyes upon the street. eyes belonging to those we call the natural proprietors of the street. the building on a main street equipped to handle strangers and ensure the safety of residents and strangers must be oriented to the street. the natural proprietors can not turn their backs and leave it blind. jane jacobs was a life student of urban plan scption ensured criticism going into a male dosm nated field. they called her a housewife and a crazy dame and organized grass-roots effort
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 265 (some duplicates have been removed)